Family and Others travel guidance

  1. Travellers entering Canada
  2. ArriveCAN app
  3. Border restrictions
  4. Exemptions to border restrictions
  5. Compassionate entry
  6. Mandatory quarantine or mandatory isolation
  7. Compliance and enforcement
  8. Travellers within Canada
  9. Travellers departing Canada
  10. Protect yourself and others
  11. Leaving Canada while in mandatory quarantine
  12. Avoid all travel on cruise ships outside Canada
  13. Non-medical masks or face coverings while travelling

 

Travellers entering Canada

To limit the spread of COVID-19, travellers entering Canada must follow the rules set out by the emergency orders under the Quarantine Act.

No one should travel when sick. Commercial airline restrictions may also prevent you from boarding your plane if you’re sick. However, Canadians, persons with status under the Indian Act and permanent residents who have COVID-19 symptoms are allowed to return to Canada.

When entering Canada, you’ll be:

  • asked if you have a cough, fever or difficulty breathing
  • required to acknowledge that you must:
    • quarantine for 14 days if you don’t have symptoms or
    • isolate for 14 days if you have symptoms
  • asked if you have a suitable place to isolate or quarantine, where:
    • you’ll have access to basic necessities, including water, food, medication and heat during the winter months
    • you won’t have contact with people who:
      • are 65 years or older
      • have underlying medical conditions
      • have compromised immune systems
    • you won’t be in a group or community living arrangement such as:
      • industrial camps
      • student residences
      • construction trailers
      • residential or long-term care facilities
      • sharing a small apartment
      • living in the same household with large families or many people
      • having roommates who haven’t travelled with you that you can’t avoid
  • given instructions about the actions you must take under the emergency order and the penalties for non-compliance

Travellers entering Canada must:

  • provide traveller contact information through:
    • the ArriveCAN mobile app or
    • an accessible web-based form or
    • a paper forms
  • undergo screening by a border official
  • answer any relevant questions:
    • when you arrive in Canada
    • during your 14-day period while in quarantine or isolation

Government of Canada representatives at Canadian ports of entry will:

  • administer the emergency orders on behalf of the Public Health Agency of Canada
  • assess your potential risks to public health under the Quarantine Act
  • determine if you:
    • have suitable plans for quarantine or isolation
    • need to be transferred to a designated quarantine facility, if no other suitable options are available
    • have no symptoms of COVID-19 and can continue domestic travel to your place of quarantine

The information border officials collect helps the Public Health Agency of Canada with its compliance and enforcement efforts. Providing false or misleading information is an offence under the Quarantine Act and can result in fines and potentially prison time.

ArriveCAN app

Use this mobile app to speed up your arrival process in Canada and spend less time with border and public health officers. Submit your information easily and securely using the app within 48 hours before arriving in Canada. The app helps you to:

  • provide mandatory information that’s required for entry into Canada
  • reduce your wait time and points of contact at the border
  • provide the Government of Canada with voluntary updates on your quarantine compliance and the development of any symptoms during the 14 days after arriving in Canada

Download the ArriveCAN app (iOSAndroid or web format). Make sure you have the official version by downloading it here.

Border restrictions

If you’re a foreign national (not a Canadian citizen or a permanent resident of Canada), you won’t be able to enter Canada if you have COVID-19 symptoms. The exception is if you’re a protected person under the Immigration and Refugee Protection Act.
There are currently border restrictions for discretionary (optional) travel to Canada:

Discretionary travel includes, but is not limited to, tourism, recreation, and entertainment.

If a traveller’s entry is permitted, they’ll be subject to mandatory quarantine for 14 days.

Exemptions to border restrictions

You’ll only be considered for an exemption to border restrictions at Canada’s ports of entry if your reason for travel is:

  • included in the conditions outlined in the emergency orders or
  • on the list of group exemptions from entry prohibitions or
  • on the list of group exemptions quarantine requirements

There are exemptions that will allow visiting immediate family members and extended family members to enter Canada. Your family member must be a Canadian citizen or a permanent resident in order to enter Canada.

For immediate family members, you’ll be required to demonstrate that you plan on entering Canada for a period of at least 15 days.

For extended family members, you’ll be required to:

  • demonstrate you intend to enter for a period of at least 15 days
  • have a declaration signed by the Canadian citizen or permanent resident that confirms your relationship
  • be authorized in writing by Immigration, Refugees, and Citizenship Canada to enter Canada to be with your extended family member

You don’t require an interpretive letter from the Public Health Agency of Canada in order to be exempted from the prohibition to enter Canada as an immediate or extended family member.

Compassionate entry

There are exemptions that will allow family and friends to enter Canada. These are in limited situations for compassionate reasons to visit a:

  • Canadian citizen
  • permanent resident
  • temporary resident­
  • protected person
  • a person registered as an Indian under the Indian Act

You’ll only be considered for an exemption to border restrictions for compassionate reasons at Canada’s ports of entry if:

  • you don’t have symptoms of COVID-19, with the exception of a protected person
  • your reason for travel is:
    • to be present during the final moments of life for a loved one or provide support to a loved one who has a critical illness or
    • to provide care for a person who has a medical reason for needing support or
    • to attend a funeral and you have applied for a limited release from mandatory quarantine before arriving in Canada

The exemption from the prohibition to enter Canada for compassionate reasons can apply to anyone, not just an extended family of Canadians.

Apply for an exemption for compassionate reasons.

You’ll be required to bring documentation from the Public Health Agency of Canada in order to be exempted from the prohibition to enter Canada for compassionate reasons.

A government representative at the border will determine if your reason for travelling to Canada can be considered for exemption under the emergency orders.

Foreign nationals arriving from the U.S. may be able to enter Canada for non-discretionary (non-optional) travel purposes.

Foreign nationals arriving from countries other than the U.S. may also be allowed to enter Canada. However, their travel must be non-discretionary (non-optional) or fall under exemptions set out in the emergency order. For example:

  • an immediate family member of a Canadian citizen or permanent resident who is travelling to be with an immediate family member and is planning to stay for a period of at least 15 days
    • foreign nationals who are allowed into Canada under this exemption must quarantine for 14 days

Being exempt from border restrictions does not mean you’re exempt from other requirements, including:

  • mandatory quarantine
  • any additional public health requirements of the province or territory where you’ll be quarantining and staying while in Canada

In some cases, your reason for travelling may be considered essential by a province, territory or under Canada’s National Strategy for Critical Infrastructure. However, you’ll only be given an exemption by the Government of Canada if your reason for travel is considered essential under the Quarantine Act‘s emergency orders.

Foreign nationals who meet an exemption to the border restrictions must still present the appropriate travel documents at the border. This includes citizenship documents or work permits. Government representatives will make the final decision on your entry to Canada at the port of entry.

For more information on the restrictions to enter Canada and the exemptions, consult the Canada Border Services Agency.

Mandatory quarantine or mandatory isolation

Before travelling to Canada, all travellers must plan for their mandatory 14-day quarantine period, which starts on the date they arrive. Government of Canada representatives will conduct health screenings at the time of entry to Canada and let you know if you need to quarantine or isolate.

If you don’t have COVID-19 symptoms, you must quarantine for 14 days while you’re still at risk of developing symptoms and infecting others.

Should you develop symptoms or test positive for COVID-19 during your 14 day quarantine, you must begin isolating for an additional 14 days from the date of your positive test result or onset of symptoms.

  • Quarantine instructions for travellers without symptoms of COVID-19 returning to Canada
  • Quarantine instructions for Canadians crossing the border daily to attend school in the U.S.

If you have COVID-19 symptoms, you must isolate for 14 days. The only people who may enter Canada if they have COVID-19 or any symptoms of COVID-19 are:

  • Canadians
  • persons with status under the Indian Act
  • permanent residents
  • protected persons, if entering at a land port of entry

Isolation instructions for travellers with COVID-19 symptoms returning to Canada

All travellers entering Canada, whether in mandatory quarantine or isolation, must:

  • arrange for a suitable place to quarantine or isolate, within your financial means
  • go directly to your place of quarantine or isolation, without stopping anywhere
  • wear a non-medical mask or face covering while travelling to the place where you’ll quarantine or isolate
  • stay at your place of quarantine or isolation for 14 days (only leave to seek medical assistance if needed)
  • not use shared spaces such as courtyards, restaurants, gyms or pools if you’re staying at a hotel or paid lodging
  • not have any guests, even if you’re outside and stay 2 metres apart from them
  • monitor your health for symptoms of COVID-19
  • follow all other guidance provided by your local public health authority

In your place of quarantine, you may use shared spaces or private outdoor spaces provided you:

  • avoid contact with others who didn’t travel with you
  • clean and disinfect spaces after use
  • wear a suitable non-medical mask or face covering if a distance of 2 metres from others residing in your place of quarantine can’t be maintained

For those in isolation, you’re required to stay inside.

You’re strongly urged to make housing arrangements for quarantine or isolation before you arrive in Canada. In most cases, this can be in your own home or in the same place you’re visiting in Canada.

If this isn’t possible, you should consider making alternative arrangements that are within your own financial means. A suitable place is one where you:

  • won’t have contact with people who are vulnerable, such as those who:
    • are 65 years or older
    • have underlying medical conditions
    • have compromised immune systems
  • aren’t in a group living environment, such as:
    • student residences
    • long-term care facilities
    • industrial camps
    • living in the same household with large families or many people where there’s close contact and you share common spaces
  • can stay for at least 14 days (and possibly longer)
  • have access to basic necessities, including water, food, medication and heat during the winter months

Exceptions to staying with a vulnerable person include if:

  • they’re a consenting adult
  • they’re either the parent or the minor in a parent-minor relationship

Before you travel, you must plan to quarantine or isolate in a suitable place. If you don’t, you may be assessed further by a government representative at the border. If you can’t quarantine in your own home, consider other options within your financial means, such as:

  • hotel
  • motel
  • other paid housing
  • friends or family, as long as you won’t expose anyone who:
    • is not part of your travel group
    • is at risk of more severe outcomes of COVID-19

If no other options are available, travellers may be referred to a designated quarantine facility as a last resort. This decision will be made by a government representative at the border.

After you arrive in Canada, a representative of the Government of Canada will call you to monitor compliance with your mandatory quarantine or isolation. We ask that you please answer calls from 1-888-336-7735.

Travellers who need medical testing or time-sensitive medical services while in quarantine or isolation

If you need to seek testing or time-sensitive medical services , you must:

  • immediately return to your place of quarantine or isolation location afterwards
  • wear a non-medical mask or face covering while in transit

We also recommended that you contact your local public health authority and follow any additional instructions they provide.

Travellers with symptoms (mandatory isolation)

No one should travel when sick. Commercial airline restrictions may also prevent you from boarding your plane if you’re sick. However, Canadians, persons with status under the Indian Act and permanent residents who have COVID-19 symptoms are allowed to return to Canada.

If you arrive in Canada with symptoms of COVID-19, let a border official know. A Government of Canada representative will then be contacted to assess your situation. If you need it, they’ll help you get medical care.

Foreign nationals won’t be allowed to enter Canada if they have COVID-19 or any symptoms of COVID-19.

In addition to the steps described above for mandatory quarantine or isolation, if you have symptoms of COVID-19 you must also:

  • use private transportation (such as your own vehicle) to get to your place of isolation
  • wear a suitable non-medical mask or face covering while in transit
  • practise physical distancing at all times
  • not go outside, including private outdoor spaces, like backyards or balconies, at your place of isolation

If your symptoms get worse during your isolation period, contact your local public health authority and follow their instructions.

Isolation instructions for travellers with COVID-19 symptoms returning to Canada

Travellers without symptoms (mandatory quarantine)

If you’re in mandatory quarantine and have no COVID-19 symptoms, you may use a private outdoor space if your place of quarantine has one. This means one that’s not shared with anyone else.

Avoid contact with those who:

  • are 65 years or older
  • have underlying medical conditions
  • have compromised immune systems

You may only quarantine with somebody from the above group if:

  • they consent to the quarantine or are the parent or minor in a parent-minor relationship
  • you complete a form provided by a government representative at the port of entry explaining the consent and receive authorization to proceed

If you develop COVID-19 symptoms within your 14-day quarantine period:

  • isolate yourself from others immediately
  • contact your public health authority and follow their instructions
  • extend your quarantine to 14 days from the day your symptoms developed

Quarantine instructions for travellers without symptoms of COVID-19 returning to Canada

Exemptions to mandatory quarantine

There are no exemptions from mandatory quarantine for:

  • travellers entering Canada who have tested negative for COVID-19
    • this is because a negative test for COVID-19 doesn’t confirm that a traveller wasn’t exposed after the test was taken or during their travel to Canada
  • travellers entering Canada who have recovered from COVID-19
    • this is because there’s a potential risk of re-infection and it’s not yet certain how long the virus is contagious

You can apply for limited release from mandatory quarantine for compassionate reasons, such as:

  • to be present during the final moments of life for a loved one
  • attending a funeral
  • supporting a critically ill loved one
  • providing care to someone who has a valid medical reason for needing it

This release only applies to activities directly relating to the compassionate exemption. You’ll be expected to stay in your place of quarantine at all other times.

Some provinces and territories don’t currently allow for limited release from quarantine. Please check your provincial or territorial health authority website.

Apply for a limited release from mandatory quarantine.

If you don’t have symptoms of COVID-19 and you’re a member of one of the exempt classes of persons listed in the mandatory isolation order, then you don’t have to quarantine, but are required to respect the intent of the order in addition to any provincial and local requirements. This exemption from federal quarantine requirements includes, with conditions, persons who perform an essential job or function, as described in the order.

If you’re exempt from the 14-day quarantine requirement, you must still:

  • monitor your health for COVID-19 symptoms
  • wear a non-medical mask or face covering while in public settings if physical distancing can’t be maintained
  • follow public health guidance and prevention measures from your local health authority and your employer

You don’t require an interpretive letter from the Public Health Agency of Canada in order to be exempted from an emergency order.

If you’ve requested an interpretive letter for a future travel exemption, this letter would be taken into account. However, it wouldn’t be considered a final decision for entry or for quarantine requirements.

A government representative at the border will determine if your reason for travelling to Canada can be considered for exemption under the emergency orders.

Isolate yourself from others right away if you develop COVID-19 symptoms and contact your local public health authority for further instruction.
Employers of exempt workers should conduct active daily monitoring of their staff for COVID-19 symptoms, checking for cough, fever or shortness of breath. Use the risk assessment tool for workplaces and businesses for more guidance.

Compliance and enforcement

Violating any instructions provided to you when you entered Canada or failing to provide accurate information is an offence under the Quarantine Act and could lead to up to:

  • 6 months in prison and/or
  • $750,000 in fines

If you choose to break your mandatory quarantine or isolation, resulting in the death or serious bodily harm to another person, you could face:

  • a fine of up to $1,000,000 or
  • imprisonment of up to 3 years or
  • both

The Contraventions Act gives police (including the RCMP, provincial and local police) more power to enforce the Quarantine Act. They can issue tickets to people who don’t comply with the act or the emergency orders. Fines range from $275 to $1,000.

Travellers within Canada

As of March 30, 2020, all airline passengers in Canada will be subject to a health check prior to boarding. You won’t be able to board if you:

  • show any symptoms of COVID-19
  • are subject to a provincial or local public health order
  • have been refused boarding in the past 14 days due to a medical reason related to COVID-19

If you weren’t allowed on a flight because you had COVID-19 symptoms, you can’t board any other flight until:

  • 14 days have passed and you no longer have symptoms or
  • you present a medical certificate confirming that your symptoms aren’t related to COVID-19

Travellers within Canada may be subject to additional provincial, territorial and local public health measures at your final destination. In addition, they may be exempted from provincial or territorial border restrictions within Canada if their reason for travelling within Canada is to provide support to a business that’s considered essential:

  • by Public Safety Canada
  • within a province or territory

Protect yourself and others

Canadian citizens and permanent residents are advised to avoid all non-essential travel outside of Canada until further notice to limit the spread of COVID-19.

The best way to protect yourself, your family and those most at risk of severe illness from COVID-19 in our communities is to choose to stay in Canada. Contact your airline or tour operator to determine options for cancelling or postponing your trip.

Many countries have put in place travel or border restrictions, such as movement restrictions and quarantines. Many airlines have reduced or suspended flights and many airports have closed.

These restrictions are changing quickly and may be imposed by countries with little warning. Your travel plans may be severely disrupted. Should you choose to take non-essential travel outside Canada, you may be forced to remain outside of Canada longer than expected.

It’s important to remember that if you choose to travel abroad:

  • your trip may become much longer than you planned
  • you may have reduced access to quality health care
  • you could be subject to the measures of other countries

If you’re still considering travel outside of Canada, you should:

  • understand the risks to your safety and security abroad
  • check the pandemic travel health notice before travelling
  • know the health risks and travel restrictions and requirements for your destination
  • make sure you have enough money and necessities, including medication, in case your travel is disrupted

Protect yourself and others

If you must travel or are already outside Canada, get the latest advice and information for your safety and security.

During your trip:

  • wear a non-medical mask or face covering when physical distancing can’t be maintained
  • cough and sneeze into a tissue or the bend of your arm
  • be aware of the local situation and follow local public health advice
  • take precautions against respiratory illnesses, which includes:
    • avoiding contact with sick people
    • avoiding large crowds or crowded areas
  • wash your hands often with soap under warm running water for at least 20 seconds
    • if none is available, use hand sanitizer containing at least 60% alcohol

If you feel sick during your flight or upon arrival:

  • seek medical attention
  • look for messaging on airport screens to guide you
  • inform the flight attendant or a border services officer

When travelling outside Canada, expect increased health screening measures at points of entry for international destinations, including airports and land borders. Local authorities may impose control measures suddenly, including movement restrictions such as quarantines.

Leaving Canada while in mandatory quarantine or isolation

No one should travel when sick. Commercial airline restrictions may also prevent you from boarding your plane if you’re sick.

If you arrive in Canada and have started your 14-day mandatory quarantine or isolation period but then have to leave the country before this period ends, you must:

  • continue to quarantine or isolate until you depart Canada
  • wear a non-medical mask or face covering while around others
  • get permission and follow the instructions laid out by a quarantine officer (for people in isolation only)

Avoid all travel on cruise ships outside Canada

Canada is advising Canadian citizens and permanent residents to avoid all travel on cruise ships outside Canada until further notice.

Cruise passengers include travellers from around the world who may be arriving from areas with known or unknown spread of COVID-19. The virus can spread quickly on board cruises due to the close contact between passengers. Older people and people with a weakened immune system or underlying medical conditions are at a higher risk of developing severe disease.

Cruise ship outbreaks of COVID-19 indicate that a large number of individuals onboard can become infected.

As the COVID-19 situation evolves, many countries outside of Canada have put policies and restrictions in place to contain the global outbreak. These restrictions may impact a cruise traveller’s:

  • itinerary
  • ability to disembark
  • access to health care

If an outbreak of COVID-19 occurs on your cruise ship while you are outside of Canada:

  • you could be subject to quarantine procedures onboard ship or in a foreign country
  • the range of consular services available to those on cruise ships may be significantly restricted by local authorities, especially in situations of quarantine
  • you must quarantine for 14 days upon your return to Canada

The Government of Canada isn’t planning additional repatriation flights to bring Canadians home during the COVID-19 pandemic. If an outbreak of COVID-19 occurs on your cruise ship while you’re outside of Canada, our ability to help may be limited. Your options to return to Canada may also be limited due to decreased availability of flights.

For information on domestic cruises and passenger vessels, refer to the following:

  • COVID-19 measures, updates, and guidance for marine transportation issued by Transport Canada

Non-medical masks or face coverings while travelling

All air travellers, with some exceptions, are required to wear a non-medical mask or face covering while travelling.

The following people should not wear a mask:

  • children under 2 years old
  • people who need help to remove a mask
  • people who provide a medical certificate certifying that they’re unable to wear a face mask for a medical reason

You may also be required to wear a non-medical mask or face covering on other modes of transportation that are federally regulated. Before you travel, check to see how transportation measures affect your plans and what you need to pack.

For more information please call or write

phone     info@agnihotriimigration.com

 

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